3.5 Compare and contrast static routing and dynamic routing

Static routing and dynamic routing differ in many regards, but the essence is the same. In order for a router to make a routing decision it needs routes entered into the routing table. Static routes are fixed and do not allow for easy expansion or fault tolerance (although static routes can be programmed to offer …

3.4 Configure, verify, and troubleshoot inter-VLAN routing

3.4.a Router on a stick ROS or Router on a stick is a uncommon topology that involves a router connected to a single trunk port on a switch. If a packet needs to go from one VLAN to another it must flow into the trunk port of the switch into the router and then back …

3.3 Describe how a routing table is populated by different routing information sources

From 3.2 blog post: 3.2.e Administrative distance Administrative distance is the way Cisco routers chose between routes with the same prefix. Cisco favours some types of routes and routing protocols over others. Refer to line 3 of the routing table above: O 10.234.132.0/24 [110/2] via 10.200.20.46, 00:34:57, GigabitEthernet5/0 The square brackets hold the Administrative Distance …

3.2 Interpret the components of a routing table

Let’s bring up the routing table of R1:   3.2.a Prefix The prefix refers to the network prefix. In  R1’s routing table there are 3 prefixes listed: /8, /24, /28 The prefix refers to the number of binary 1’s in the binary network mask: /8   = 11111111.00000000.00000000.00000000 /24 = 11111111.11111111.11111111.00000000 /28 = 11111111.11111111.11111111.11110000 3.2.b …

3.1 Describe the routing concepts

3.1.a Packet handling along the path through a network A packet refers to an IP packet which has a source and destination IP address in the header.  Throughout the network the packet is forwarded based on the information in the Router’s Information Base (RIB) with the longest prefix chosen. Here is a picture of a …